Answered

Workflow for FPS Arms with different weapons / modes

TheCodingGuppy 7 months ago updated by Peter - Soxware Developer 7 months ago 5
I'm really appreciating the software so far.

I wanted to ask about best practices and workflow for working with a set of FPS arms.

I want to do different animation sets for say, a gun, a melee, and just empty hands for magic.

The gun and melee animation workflow so far depend on IK handles and another object called a "holder". The holder stores the gun, and the IK handle follows the holder (Child Of).

I'm wondering now, if i complete a few animations for my gun, and then want to make some for my melee, what the best approach would be. It seems that perhaps a new separate project would be in order? That way I could customize the rig different for the melee and the empty hands.

I just want to be able to go back into seamlessly making my gun animations, then working on my melee, and move back and forth between them without having to completely redo my rigs and such in config mode.

Can anyone including the develops offer some guidance about proper workflow, saving rigs and working with projects so that i can handle this growing complexity in my animations.
UMotion Version:
1.29p02
Unity Version:
2021

Answer

Answer
Answered

Hi,
thank you very much for your support request.

If your rig setups are different, using different UMotion Project files is mandatory. So yes, create one UMotion project per "rig version". If you want, you can also create a new Unity scene solely for animating your different fps configurations. Instantiate all the different FPS arm configurations right next to each other so that you can quickly change from one to another.

Please let me know in case you have any follow-up questions.

Best regards,
Peter

Answer
Answered

Hi,
thank you very much for your support request.

If your rig setups are different, using different UMotion Project files is mandatory. So yes, create one UMotion project per "rig version". If you want, you can also create a new Unity scene solely for animating your different fps configurations. Instantiate all the different FPS arm configurations right next to each other so that you can quickly change from one to another.

Please let me know in case you have any follow-up questions.

Best regards,
Peter

thank you for your response. Yes, that does sound like a good idea. I’m still figuring things out and perhaps I can do it all with one configuration or have multiple. I will try multiple for now. 

You mentioned instantiating the different fps arm configurations. What do you mean by that?

I assumed that the configurations were the .asset files we save through the UMotion software, and not tied directly to the fps model/rig or prefab. 


if they are tied together, how are they tied together? 

I know that when you drag the GameObject with the rig and the animator into the UMotion inspector, that’s when they are tied together, and they are “untied” so to speak when you click on the “clear” button to resume working with the editor as per usual.

some clarity about this would be great.


thank you again for your time and your prompt responses. 

You mentioned instantiating the different fps arm configurations. What do you mean by that?

Sorry for not being clear about this. Creating an instance of a prefab means that you drag it into a Unity scene (you could also call it "spawning").

I assumed that the configurations were the .asset files we save through the UMotion software, and not tied directly to the fps model/rig or prefab.

A UMotion project file (*.asset) contains all the UMotion related configuration of the model/rig you had assigned to the UMotion Pose Editor. The UMotion project stores the names of all the bones/transforms of the rig etc. and is thus only compatible with the same type of rig.
It does not however store a reference to a specific instance of your model/rig in your scene. So you can for example have your model in multiple different scenes and it would still be compatible with the UMotion project file. As long as the rig is the same.

Hope this helps :-) Let me know if you need further explanation.


Best regards,
Peter

Hey there Peter,

thank you for your prompt response.

I think I understand. For the one FPS Arms model prefab asset that I am using, I can set up difference scenes where that same prefab will be there with the appropriate fps camera, and then for each of those scenes, i can have a corresponding separate UMotion config file, that I load up appropriately when I am ready to work on the specific animation sets.

I've begun to do this a little and I like the workflow. What I've done is duplicate the umotion asset that i've worked on for my pistol, as it has the extra rig components such as the IK, pole target, and holder transforms, as well as the appropriate constraints. I just rename it for my rifle, and then set up a new scene and connect and load that new duplicated Umotion project. I then just delete the clips from the other project and start a new. I'll just keep doing that for each new weapon or setup I'm going to do. It seems to work fine so far. I appreciate the advice about these separate "scene setups". It makes things much easier and cleaner, and the animations still work perfectly in other scenes.


The only thing I need to remember is to change the Umotion project file when I go to a new scene, as the clip editor maintains the one that I am and was currently working on. If I remember to do this, then I think everything else should be fine.

I'm really appreciating this software so far. It helps especially with the FPS animation. With Blender to Unity, it's hard to line up the camera say for aim down sight so that it will correspond perfectly to screen center. This software has the rig tools such as the IK and child-of that are so crucial to such projects. And i've very grateful and happy with the support you all provide for the product. Both of them are really good, and together they make for a great service.


Looking forward to really getting in the swing of things,

Thanks,

Neil

Thank you very much for your detailed write up and your kind words, Neil. Much appreciated.

Don't hesitate to reach out again in case you have any further questions.

Best regards,
Peter