Answered

Some questions regarding UMotion Pros purpose and functionalities.

dfo ko 2 months ago updated by Peter - Soxware Developer 2 months ago 4

I have a few questions regarding some of UMotions features in comparison to animating in external software.

1)Is using Umotion to create animations from scratch a good idea? What is the purpose of Umotion besides cutting out the process of exporting the animation from an animation software into the game and then testing it there?

2)Is Umotion mainly used to tweak animations rather than create them? The issue I feel is that by importing the animations from another software you are losing all the IK and modifiers from it, therefore the tweaks must not be drastic.


Some issues I'm having and wondering how I can speed up this process.Is it possible to somehow test the animations at runtime? I have certain VFX and sounds which occur when the animation is triggered as well as physics for hair and clothes. Is there some way to simulate that during editing?


The last question I have is if the previous request isn't possible. How would I be able to quickly resume to editing after testing the animation at runtime? Having to create, export the animation under the same name, test it during runtime, and then having to drag the root object into the pose editor can someones get very tedious. I was wondering if there is any way to cut out some of these steps.


Thank you!

UMotion Version:
Pro
Unity Version:
2019

Answer

Answer
Answered

Hi,
thank you very much for your support request.

1)Is using Umotion to create animations from scratch a good idea?

Sure, why not? I mean, that's totally up to you to decide :-)

What is the purpose of Umotion besides cutting out the process of exporting the animation from an animation software into the game and then testing it there?

It makes Unity a one stop shop. No need for different software for different tasks. Usually reduces development time. Import/export from third party software often isn't a pleasing experience.

2)Is Umotion mainly used to tweak animations rather than create them?

No UMotion is used for both, creating new ones and tweaking existing ones.

The issue I feel is that by importing the animations from another software you are losing all the IK and modifiers from it, therefore the tweaks must not be drastic.

UMotion is capable of turning an existing animation into an IK animation. Usually for animations that you've purchased/downloaded from the Asset Store or any other 3D trading platform, you usually do not get the source files (with the IK modifiers).


If you've created the animation yourself in a 3D software, feel free to continue editing it where you've created it.

Some issues I'm having and wondering how I can speed up this process.Is it possible to somehow test the animations at runtime? I have certain VFX and sounds which occur when the animation is triggered as well as physics for hair and clothes. Is there some way to simulate that during editing?

Play your game, once you detect an animation you want to change, hit pause. Edit the animation, export and continue playing where you left.

The UMotion API and UMotion callback mechanism can be used to extend UMotion with custom scripts that are even executed during edit time. Might help you in the case you described.

How would I be able to quickly resume to editing after testing the animation at runtime? Having to create, export the animation under the same name, test it during runtime, and then having to drag the root object into the pose editor can someones get very tedious.

If you already have a UMotion project for your character and the related animation clip in it, you just need 2 additional button presses:

0) Pause game

1) Assign character to the pose editor

2) After editing the animation, press the shortcut for exporting the animation

3) Resume game


By using the UMotion API, you could even further automate this (e.g. create a custom menu item/shortcut that pauses the game and assigns a predefined character to UMotion and a second shortcut that exports and resumes the game).

Please let me know in case you have any follow-up questions.

Best regards,
Peter

I also want to add that even though the product is good, I find the UI harder to use than blender. I.e. harder to select certain bones and apply simple modifiers like mirroring or duplicating a pose to another bone.

Answer
Answered

Hi,
thank you very much for your support request.

1)Is using Umotion to create animations from scratch a good idea?

Sure, why not? I mean, that's totally up to you to decide :-)

What is the purpose of Umotion besides cutting out the process of exporting the animation from an animation software into the game and then testing it there?

It makes Unity a one stop shop. No need for different software for different tasks. Usually reduces development time. Import/export from third party software often isn't a pleasing experience.

2)Is Umotion mainly used to tweak animations rather than create them?

No UMotion is used for both, creating new ones and tweaking existing ones.

The issue I feel is that by importing the animations from another software you are losing all the IK and modifiers from it, therefore the tweaks must not be drastic.

UMotion is capable of turning an existing animation into an IK animation. Usually for animations that you've purchased/downloaded from the Asset Store or any other 3D trading platform, you usually do not get the source files (with the IK modifiers).


If you've created the animation yourself in a 3D software, feel free to continue editing it where you've created it.

Some issues I'm having and wondering how I can speed up this process.Is it possible to somehow test the animations at runtime? I have certain VFX and sounds which occur when the animation is triggered as well as physics for hair and clothes. Is there some way to simulate that during editing?

Play your game, once you detect an animation you want to change, hit pause. Edit the animation, export and continue playing where you left.

The UMotion API and UMotion callback mechanism can be used to extend UMotion with custom scripts that are even executed during edit time. Might help you in the case you described.

How would I be able to quickly resume to editing after testing the animation at runtime? Having to create, export the animation under the same name, test it during runtime, and then having to drag the root object into the pose editor can someones get very tedious.

If you already have a UMotion project for your character and the related animation clip in it, you just need 2 additional button presses:

0) Pause game

1) Assign character to the pose editor

2) After editing the animation, press the shortcut for exporting the animation

3) Resume game


By using the UMotion API, you could even further automate this (e.g. create a custom menu item/shortcut that pauses the game and assigns a predefined character to UMotion and a second shortcut that exports and resumes the game).

Please let me know in case you have any follow-up questions.

Best regards,
Peter

Thank you! These tips helped a ton. Is it possible to hide certain bones? Is there a way to capture a pose that is in play mode?

Is it possible to hide certain bones?

Yes, switch into config mode. Then select the bone you want to hide. Open the "Properties" tab and set "Visibility" to "Hide" (or "Lock" if you also don't want the bone to be included in the exported animation). More information about config mode:

https://www.soxware.com/umotion-manual/Lesson5.html

Is there a way to capture a pose that is in play mode?

To capture a current pose from play mode, pause playmode at the right moment. Then create a fresh UMotion project file and assign your character to the pose editor. The character now still has the same pose as previously in play mode.

If you now want to use that pose in a different UMotion project: Select all bones (CTRL + A) and then click on "Copy Pose" in the Pose Editor. Open your target UMotion project, assign your character again to the pose editor, select all bones (CTRL + A) and click on "Paste Pose".


Unfortunately there isn't a faster method to do this yet.


Best regards,
Peter